This is what the city that inspired the game looks like

In Assassin’s Creed Valhalla, you will be transported between Norway and England from 873 AD. In the game is the Scandinavian village of Jorvik, which was founded by the Romans in AD 71, but in Valhalla the Roman Empire is no more and it is the Vikings who have taken control. Today the village is called Jorvik York and the PC Gamer site went there to compare Jorvik in the 9th century, depicted in Ubisoft’s game, with the city it is today. Are you ready ? Let’s make the visit.

City walls

York is known for its historic walls, which attract many tourists. The ones that are still standing today date from 700 years ago. These walls are made of crumbling stone and there are newer ones made of wood.

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Coppergate Market

It used to be a busy marketplace. It’s full of life in Ubisoft’s game. Unfortunately, the streets have lost a lot of business over the years and the Covid-19 crisis is not helping.

York Minster

This colossal cathedral today is very different from the time of the Vikings. However, the scale is impressive and you can use it in the game to get a great view for yourself.

The Dompark

Roman remains

Roman ruins can be found everywhere in Valhalla. In reality there aren’t that many. In the 1960s, a Roman column was discovered near York Minster, built around AD 100 by Julius Caesar’s Ninth Legion. And for the record, the column was placed here, but upside down.

The river Ouse

This is one of the two rivers that York crosses. It is a strategic body of water because the Vikings who attacked the north coast went up the Ouse to conquer the city.

The Foss River

York’s second river. Smaller, it was an important trade route for Romans and Vikings.

The Ouse Bridge

Skeldergate Bridge

It was the Romans who built the first bridges in York. However, over time they collapsed and the Vikings replaced them with wooden bridges. Now all wooden bridges have disappeared, but over the centuries the bridges have always been rebuilt in almost the same places.

River splitting

This is where Ouse and Foss split up.

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