The world as we know it was born 48 years ago

“The dark side of the moon”: the world as we know it was born 48 years ago

The NiT chronicler celebrates the anniversary of Pink Floyd’s historic album.

“I’ve been crazy for a long time.” So begins Pink Floyd’s most established album and possibly the most recognizable brand in rock history, making 48 years of madness this Monday March 1st. And what can I write that hasn’t been said about this record that changed everything? Everyone who knows me knows that I like superlatives, and maybe that’s why I never wrote about “The Dark Side of the Moon”. There is no publicly overlaid CD like this. I see him as a spoiled son who already has enough attention from everyone and as such doesn’t need my clothes in public. That doesn’t mean you don’t do it in private. I went to my Discogs database and have 17 copies of this album at home. Yes, you read that right, seventeen. And not to mention that the immersion box contains eight different versions (original, remix, surround, quadraphonic, live, demo, etc.) or that the album is completely on the live disc ”, Of which I have 5 different versions. I’m a fan, you know the idea. So if I have never written about the “dark side” because I am simple by nature, it is because I am afraid of leaning over when I search for superlative terms in the Portuguese language (didn’t I say? ) For this album. I will do my best here.

The skeptics say that music cannot change the world. But how could it not be when music changes the lives of so many people? Mine has been shaken several times in different chapters of my existence by records that landed in my world, always at the right time. The first will have been “The Dark Side of the Moon”. In Castelo Branco we were introduced to alcohol very early on. And I soon learned that Pink Floyd was best valued with a blood alcohol level. But that’s not how I started listening to them when my father played the “dark side” at the tender age of zero. I was still in my mother’s womb. Maybe that’s why I got this madness. Or it was because of this Venice concert in 1989 with the stage on the water and the audience on gondolas, which my father recorded on VHS (“on a thunderstorm night”, he will tell) and which I saw with wide eyes and imagination got in space whenever there were visitors at home. Or it was because of the arrival at home of that magical CD from The Division Bell in 1994, which my father played every Sunday morning, and which was so ingrained in my brain that even today it hasn’t been a week. Listen to him. It was therefore not with alcohol that I was introduced to the “dark side”. The record already existed in my life. But when I was 15 and thought I already knew everything about the world (and in fact I knew so little), I heard the “dark side” in the dark, catalyzed by half a dozen averages, and suddenly it all made sense. It was the first time I “noticed” Roger Waters and I’ve been listening to him since then. I thought I had been warned of the traps in the world that Uncle Roger had pointed out so brilliantly. And look at me today, 20 years later, and fatally fall into anyone.

After seeing the dark side of the moon, I never shut up with the Floyd again. I went to high school to tell everyone about my discovery, but with little luck. They looked at me like I was talking about some strange sect, and in their defense I probably expressed myself with the same insane air. With the girls, it’s not even worth talking about. The “dark side” has not made many friends. Until, at a very “watery” birthday party (“Let’s have some juice,” I said to my mother), I overheard a conversation from an older group who were talking about the Pink Floyd. Wow. After all, these people exist! The pupils in my eyes immediately widened and I could finally play my football. In that conversation I heard an interpretation of “On The Run” that is not exactly true, but so perfect that I have never questioned it. The story goes like this: the theme has a synthesizer loop that gets someone running (the theme is called “On The Run”!); You can hear breathless footsteps from someone who is certainly too late for anything; An airport announcement follows: “Have your luggage and passport ready for flights to Rome, Cairo and Lagos.” the individual runs madly towards the airplane doors, his dream goal is in his head, the escape from the doldrums of his daily life; One hears a mad laugh: “I live for today, I go tomorrow. I am so. “; the race goes on, the doors are already closed; when it finally arrives at the gate, the plane is already taking off. frustrated, he gasps to see his dream run away; and look, after getting up the plane explodes, the I had just missed before your eyes. Dew! “Let another round of averages come!” Said João Francisco. After all, sometimes the dream can be our biggest nightmare. And sometimes it’s a blessing when we don’t get what we want. We’ve all been through this.

This is why “The Dark Side of the Moon” is so universal – because it affects us all. Because the traps of dreams, time, money, nomadism, conflict and ultimately death are common to all of us. We are consumed with what we have, what we want and what we are losing. We are born, we work and we die. What is the meaning of life? Does it make sense to be afraid of death? We live to feed our own prisons – careers, auto and home rates, and the pressures of the status quo. This is why the “dark side” – an essay on the madness and stress caused by life in our western society – makes even more sense today than it did in the 1970s. There are no perfect records. But the most perfect of all records is “The Dark Side of the Moon”. I don’t think there is a bigger or better superlative than this.

Stay up to date with the live Wembley performance of the album in its entirety (one of the versions included in the box above). “See you on the dark side of the moon”.

“The dark side of the moon doesn’t exist, in fact everything is dark.”

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