IndieLisboa: 5 Sessions You Should See At The Film Festival This Year

IndieLisboa: 5 Sessions You Should See At The Film Festival This Year

The event will take place again from August 21st to September 6th at different locations in the Portuguese capital.

This year IndieLisboa could not take place in spring as usual. The 18th edition of the film festival has also been postponed. It starts this Saturday, August 21st and runs through September 6th.

The event will be divided into several locations – Cinema São Jorge, Culturgest, Cinema Ideal and Cinemateca Portuguesa, in addition to the garden of the Palácio Galveias library, where outdoor sessions take place. As always, the program is extensive, varied and with several focuses. There are a total of 276 films, including classics and novelties, spread across different sections.

There is a retrospective on the work of filmmaker and poet Sarah Maldoror, the highlights include the film “Change” by Welket Bungué with the independent deputy Joacine Qatar Moreira. The opening session will take place with the documentary “Summer of Soul (… Or, When the Revolution Could Not Be Televised)”.

NiT asked Ana Cabral Martins, who is part of the IndieLisboa programming team, for some suggestions. The complete program can be viewed online.

“The Spark Brothers,” Edgar Wright

“Edgar Wright usually makes films like ‘Shaun of the Dead’, ‘Hot Fuzz’ or ‘Scott Pilgrim vs. the World’ and this is the first time he’s making a documentary that is about a musical duo, the is fairly unknown to the general public, but is presented as your favorite band’s favorite band. They are two brothers, Ron and Russell Mael, who have a very funny life story.

The documentary features a number of interviews with musicians and comedians – and it’s a lot about the impact the Sparks not only had on musicians, but a lot of people who aren’t in the music business have very interesting things to say – like Patton Oswalt. It’s a movie that is inventive deep down, as it always manages to be, but that does bring out a glimpse of a group that may not be as well known. If someone likes the sensitivity of Edgar Wright and his films, that’s half the way to like this film. “

Meetings:
September 1, 9:30 p.m., São Jorge cinema

“Shiva Baby”, Emma Seligman

“It is a film that began as a short film that the director later expanded into a feature film. It’s about a Jewish girl. Shiva is a time of mourning for the Jewish religion and in the end she goes to a funeral session, a moment when they honor the family of a deceased and it turns out to be a super caustic and awkward comedy, a bit absurd but super funny and at the same time realistic when you are young and at a critical time in your life when you don’t have a lot of fate and suddenly you are in a super claustrophobic situation where you find yourself confronted with all the people around you who make you feel intensely. There’s an ex-girlfriend, a secret sugar daddy, lots of curious relatives and it’s really cute to see her in this situation which is completely uncomfortable, but then the dialogues are disarming and the situations she gets herself into make it great fun. “

Meetings:
August 25, 9:15 p.m., Galveias Palace Library
September 2, 7 p.m., Culturgest

“Blue Rose”, Olya Korsun

“It’s a very large, 53-minute short film and a documentary about all facets of the flower concept. That means from the question of its beauty and existence in nature, but also in our daily life. But also about more philosophical questions related to the history of the flower concept – its planting, the auctions. And it’s very interesting in the sense that there’s a very nostalgic perspective supported by vintage materials, but it also takes away a bit of the cliché idea of ​​femininity. It is very comprehensive when it comes to our relationship with flowers and how they are seen as something divine or mundane that is an everyday object. The film is divided into chapters and is really worth it. We are never bored and it really is a very charming vision of the subject. “

Meetings:
September 1, 6:45 p.m., Culturgest

“Les Sorcières de l’Orient”, Julien Faraut

“Basically, it’s about the Japanese women’s volleyball team that took part in the 1964 Tokyo Olympics. They won the gold medal and were known as the Witches of the East – they still have a record of back-to-back wins and it’s a movie they reconnect in their 70s. There is kind of a walk through his memories, there is a very fun connection because the director realizes that they were portrayed in an anime he watched as a kid. It’s a film about sports, and it’s mostly about discipline and the post-war situation in Japan. But it also looks super playful, because in addition to the anime sequel there are many pop references and even a pop aesthetic that is fun and experimental and makes the film very special. “

Meetings:
August 30, 9:45 p.m., São Jorge cinema
September 1st 9:15 pm, Galveias Palace Library

Boca do Inferno short film session

“A Boca do Inferno is a section of films that are more horror, more unsettling, or focus more on the dark and twisted universe. It was a lot of fun not only choosing the films but also organizing the session because they work so well together. And I think it’s one of those sessions not to be missed, not just for the movies – which are both hilarious and a little bit more poignant or scary or cheesy – but your final composition always has a different flavor. It works very well in the selection and in the rhythm that the films have one after the other. And I think it has to be one of the funniest sessions to watch.

The first is “Rendang of Death,” a short film about an entire restaurant that ends up competing for a single piece of rendang – a type of braised meat – and the way people win the competition is absolutely extraordinary. I also recommend ‘Bobby Pinwheel’ is a four-minute short film about what is probably the worst clown you can invite to a birthday party. “

Meetings:
August 21, 9:30 p.m., São Jorge cinema
September 2, 9:15 p.m., Galveias Palace Library

Related Articles

Back to top button