Europe’s rights want to form an alliance in the EU Parliament | free press

Something is happening on the far right of the political spectrum in the EU Parliament. Since a new alliance for Europe published a paper titled “Declaration on the Future of Europe” in early July, speculation about a concerted awakening by right-wing and nationalist parties has grown louder. Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orbán is one of…

Something is happening on the far right of the political spectrum in the EU Parliament. Since a new alliance for Europe published a paper titled “Declaration on the Future of Europe” in early July, speculation about a concerted awakening by right-wing and nationalist parties has grown louder. Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orbán and his Fidesz ruling party are as much members as France’s Marine Le Pen and her Rassemblement National (RN), Italy’s Matteo Salvini with his Lega and Polish PiS boss Jaroslaw Kaczynski. The Austrian FPÖ signed the document, as did the Spanish Vox or the Italian Fratelli d’Italia. So far, the 16 signatories belong to two parliamentary groups in the European Chamber of Deputies that are already on the right of the Christian Democratic European People’s Party (EPP), which includes the CDU and the CSU: the “European Conservatives and Reformists” (EKR). ) and the “Identity and Democracy” (ID) group. Individually they do not play a major role, but together they would have 134 seats and become the third largest force in the Strasbourg plenary.

The text is about the family “as the core of the nation”, the self-determination of peoples and a so-called “moral absolutism” of Brussels that subjugates free peoples. That is why, a few days ago, Orbán stressed that the European Parliament must be disempowered and that essential powers must be returned to the Member States. The signatories see the Charter as the cornerstone for a major reform of the EU.

However, one party is missing: the German AfD. “We would all sign this one-on-one,” AfD chief Jörg Meuthen said. But the AfD was not asked. Hungary, as well as Poland, have “certain reservations” on German rights. Main reason: In April, the federal party’s AfD Congress wrote the demand for Germany to leave the EU in the federal election manifesto. And that was too much for the other EU critics and opponents. Because even if until 2017 there were phases where Le Pen raved about a “Frexit”, i.e. France’s exit from the EU, and other party leaders did the same for her countries, times have changed. Even Orbán and Salvini know they cannot win an election campaign with anti-EU slogans. There are reasons for this: there is no alternative to the internal market and therefore to the EU. In addition, billions of dollars are currently being distributed among member states from the Corona Development Fund “Next Generation EU”. So the strategy was changed, became acceptable and made the strong-sounding appeal: “Let’s reform the Union together for the future of Europe” – these are the closing words of the declaration.

The (night)dream of a strong and united right in the EU parliament is not new, however. So far, it has only made a name for itself through several failed attempts. And the 16 signatories also had to search for the lowest common denominator for the current declaration. “Nothing goes together,” said Manfred Weber (CSU), chairman of the Christian Democrat group, after his EPP accepted two Italian politicians. They are the first to draw conclusions.

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