Christopher Nolan discusses the commercial machine of superhero films

On the occasion of the US release of his book The Nolan Variations: The Films, Mysteries and Wonders of Christopher Nolan, Christopher Nolan reviewed his entire career as a filmmaker. The latter, in particular, relies on the chance he benefited from to do his trilogy on the Dark Knight before the 2008 Marvel films that upset the superhero landscape in theaters.

The good times

In 2005, Christopher Nolan began a trilogy about the famous Dark Knight. With the realization of Batman Begins, the superhero became a true icon of the cinema. A reputation that was magnificently tarnished by the mediocre Batman Forever (1995) and Batman and Robin (1997). That surge in popularity even peaked in 2008 with the release of The Dark Knight, which was sublimated by Heath Ledger’s masterful performance as the Joker. Important work is taking place in a new superhero cycle in the cinema, initiated by the X-Men and Spider-Man sagas in the early 2000s. The forerunners of a genre that will characterize everyone’s cinematic landscape, an era exacerbated by the arrival of the Marvel Cinematic Universe in 2008 and its first feature film, Iron Man.

Christopher Nolan shares his feelings with him about this blessed time. In particular, he expresses his relief that he was able to produce his The Dark Knight trilogy.

It was a good time to tell this story. The original Batman story had never been used in theaters. We didn’t have any specific rules to follow. There was a void to fill. Superman had its definitive story with Christopher Reeve and Richard Donner. The equivalent for Batman had never been made. We wanted to tell the story of an extraordinary personality in an ordinary world.

In addition, the director of Inception claims the total freedom he enjoyed in his creative process. It thus testifies to the passage of time that was allowed to bring about the continuation of the adventures of the Black Knight.

The other benefit we had was that we could take our time between suites. When we did Batman Begins, we didn’t know when we were going to do another one. And it took three years and four years before the next. We had the luxury of the time. It wasn’t a commercial machine for the studio.

Do you agree with what Christopher Nolan said?

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